Conservative Controversies & Scandals

2017 Republican Scandals

  • Bill O'Reilly was accused of sexual harassment by at least five women and has settled five sexual harassment lawsuits out of court totaling $13 million. The lawsuits span a decade, but two of the accusations came to light in lawsuits against Fox News CEO Roger Ailes. Update: 21st Century Fox fired Bill O'Reilly effective immediately.
  • Three individuals who were assaulted at a Trump Kentucky rally in March 2016 named Donald Trump in a lawsuit against the two protesters that physically assaulted them because they claim that Trump encouraged supporters to "get them out of here." Trump has claimed immunity from the suit now that he is President, but he is on shaky legal footing because he was not President at the time of the incident.
  • Trump Endeavor 12 LLC, a company owned by Donald Trump, was ordered to pay $315,484.87 to a paint supply company after a judge found the it was at fault for not paying the paint company after they completed renovations on one of Donald Trump's golf resorts.
  • The Trump Administration said that they will not release the logs of individuals who visit the White House or meet with Donald Trump, reversing a policy set up by President Obama.
  • Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor charges stemming from his affair with a top aide. Bentley resigned after admitting that he failed to file a major contribution report and knowingly using campaign contributions for personal use.
  • Christian values proponent, and republican Alabama Governor, Robert Bentley, resigned after being charged and pleading guilty to two misdemeanor charges relating to an alleged affair with his aide that he had at first denied. The alleged affair became public following the release of inappropriate phone conversations with his aide by his ex-wife.
  • Representative Tom Price, Donald Trumps choice for Secretary of Health and Human Services, bought stock in a company that manufactures knee and hip implants and then introduced legislation that would have benefited both the company and himself days later. The company, Zimmer Biomet, then donated $1,000 to Representative Price's reelection campaign shortly thereafter. Update: ProPublica reported that "[o]n the same day the stockbroker for then-Georgia Congressman Tom Price bought him up to $90,000 of stock in six pharmaceutical companies last year, Price arranged to call a top U.S. health official, seeking to scuttle a controversial rule that could have hurt the firms’ profits and driven down their share prices, records obtained by ProPublica show."
  • Donald Trump secretly signed an updated version of his supposedly blind trust that allows him to withdraw money "at his request." The updated terms Trump signed by Trump says that the "Trustees shall distribute net income or principal to Donald J. Trump at his request, as the Trustees deem necessary for his maintenance, support or uninsured medical expenses, or as the Trustees otherwise deem appropriate."
  • Paul Manafort, Donald Trump's former campaign manager, apparently purchased homes in New York with cash. The FBI is investigation whether these purchases were legal and how he was able to pay for such extravagant expenses with cash.
  • Jared Kushner, Donald Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, met with the head of Russia's state owned bank under United States sanctions during the transition. The Trump Administration said that Kushner was acting as a campaign surrogate, but did not explain why they asked Kushner to speak with a bank that was under US Sanctions.
  • Former National Security Michael Flynn discussed kidnapping exiled Turkish cleric Fethullah Gülen from his home in Pennsylvania and covertly transporting him back to Turkey where he is wanted for allegedly aiding an attempted coup against the Turkish government. Flynn denies partaking in the conversation, but former CIA head James Woolsey insists that the conversation did take place.
  • Paul Manafort, Donald Trump's former campaign manager, secretly worked with and received millions of dollars from a Russian oligarch to implement a plan that would "greatly benefit the Putin Government." Manafort was paid to develop and execute a strategy to "influence politics, business dealings and news coverage inside the United States, Europe and former Soviet republics to benefit President Vladimir Putin's government."
  • Paul Manafort, Donald Trump's former campaign manager, is accused of laundering money he received from overthrown Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych and funneling the money to offshore bank accounts in Belize and Kyrgyzstan. Manafort had business dealing with the deposed leader, but the money laundering allegations only came to light after a Ukrainian lawmaker in the current parliament released them.
  • Oklahoma state Sen. Ralph Shortey, who was also Donald Trump's campaign chairman for the state of Oklahoma, was caught in a motel room with an underage boy after police were asked to conduct a "welfare check at a local hotel." Police proceeded to find Shortey at a Super 8 motel room with the minor boy. The police are recommending that Shortey be charged with soliciting prostitution of a minor, prostitution within 1,000 feet of church and transporting purpose of prostitution.
  • Monica Crowley, a former adviser to Donald Trump who was forced to leave her position at the National Security Council after reports that she plagiarized her book in 2012, was just hired to represent a Ukrainian Oligarch who has close ties with Russia, Crowley has long advocated for America to have closer ties to the Russian government.
  • A Trump campaign employee who landed a job at the Department of Energy after his inauguration tweeted multiple racist and anti-Islamic Tweets during the campaign and after Trump's election. Sid Bowdidge, whose official position at the DOE is "assistant to the secretary." called for the extermination of Muslims after the San Bernardino shooting by writing "@CNN Scum suckling maggots of the world. Exterminate the all." This was one of many Tweets disparaging Muslims that Bowdidge. Update: Bowdidge has been fired from the DOE.
  • Roger Stone, a top informal adviser to Donald Trump, had communications with the Russian culprits of the DNC hack that were intercepted by the FBI. Stone apparently communicated with the Russian culprit via private Twitter messages. When reached for comment by The Smoking Gun, the website that broke the story, Stone simply responded "don't recall."
  • Donald Trump was sued as a private citizen for having an unfair advantage at his recently opened hotel in Washington, D.C. The owners of Cork Wine Bar, which is around 1.5 miles from the new Trump complex, are claiming that Trump's stature as President has indirectly encouraged foreign and domestic dignitaries to stay at his hotel and eat at its restaurants and bars instead of venturing to other nearby restaurants and bars.
  • Former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn lobbied on behalf of the Turkish government at the same time he was working on Donald Trump's Presidential campaign and even after Trump was elected. Flynn recently filed paperwork with the Department of Justice that he conducted "$530,000 worth of lobbying work from August through November that may have aided the Turkish government." The Trump Administration claimed they were unaware of Flynn's lobbying.
  • Donald Trump repeatedly claimed that he never met with any Russian officials during the 2016 Presidential campaign, but he in fact did. Trump met with the Russian Ambassador to the United States minutes before a foreign policy speech on April 27, 2016. The White House released a statement claiming that the meeting was “brief and non-substantive,” but did not address Trump's claims that he never met with any Russian official during the campaign.