Conservative Controversies & Scandals

2014 Top\Worst Republican Scandals & Controversies

  • Former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell and his wife were charged in Federal Court for illegally accepting thousands of dollars in gifts, vacations, and loans from businessman Jonnie R. Williams Sr. in exchange for special treatment from the Governor. McDonnell is the first Governor to face federal charges in Virginia's long history. Update: Governor McDonnell was convicted on 11 counts. He will be sentenced on January 6th, 2015.
  • Newly elected House Majority Whip Steve Scalise spoke at a White Supremacist conference in 2002, during his tenure as a state representative in Louisiana. Representative Scalise spoke at a workshop designed "to teach the most effective and up-to-date methods of civil rights and heritage related activism." Scalise insists he didn't know that he was speaking to a hate group and says that he used to speak to any group that would hear him talk abo'ut his dislike of 'slush funds.'
  • A former aide to Representative Frank Farenthold has sued the congressman and his office staff for creating a hostile work environment and gender discrimination. The former aide accused the congressman of making sexual comments about her and claimed he is regularly drunk on the job, which caused him to say a plethora of inappropriate things. She is seeking an unspecified amount of money for lost pay and emotional distress.
  • Florida Governor Rick Scott refused to take the debate stage for over four minutes in protest over a small fan that Charlie Crist was using. The Governor claimed that Crist broke the rules of the debate, but the Crist campaign released a signed document showing otherwise.
  • The Palin family was involved in a verbal and physical altercation at a birthday party they recently attend in Alaska. Multiple witnesses have come forward and claimed the brawl started shortly after the family arrived in their stretch hummer and Palin's son Track spotted a former boyfriend of Willow Palin. The witnesses say it only escalated from there with "Palin women screaming. Palin men thumping their chests. Word is that Bristol has a particularly strong right hook, which she employed repeatedly." The Palin's were then asked to leave the party by the owner of the house, who was reportedly struck by Bristol Palin a number of times. No charges have been filed as of yet, but the police say they are investigating the brawl and will release more information at a later date.
  • Representative Tom Cotton aired a television advertisement accusing President Obama of hijacking "the farm bill and turn[ing] it into a food stamp bill." He went on to say that is the reason why he voted against the bill. This blatantly misleading advertisement neglects to inform his audience that the Farm Bill has always had provisions in it that pay for the Food Stamp program, as well as direct payments to American farmers. He also mislead his audience because the 2013 bill actually cut the budget for the Food Stamp program.
  • Fox & Friends created a graphic that appears to be directly lifted from the logo of a popular video game. The show used the graphic a number of times when discussing the recent uptick of Central American children attempting to cross into the United States. To add insult to injury, the image Fox & Friends lifted is from a video game depicting a fictional city run by a religious zealot who populated his city with individuals who "literally worship America’s Founding Fathers and uses American iconography to rile up his citizens in support of a war with all of the heathens of the world that aren’t a part of his flying city."
  • Representative Don Young has been ordered to repay $60,000 in illegally spent campaign donations he received over a period of twelve years. Young was found to have violated House ethics rules by illegally using campaign funds to go on fifteen trips to hunting lodges during that time. The Ethics Committee found that Young used more than $30,000 of his own campaigns funds and $28,000 in gifts he failed to disclose in his annual financial disclosures.
  • McLaughlin & Associates, a polling company Eric Cantor paid over $75,000 to conduct survey's about the congressman's reelection campaign, predicted the congressman would win his primary election by 34 percentage points. Cantor later went on to lose his primary by nearly ten percentage points, meaning the firm's estimate was off by 44 percentage points.
  • A major political donor under indictment in Utah has admitted to laundering thousands of dollars in donations to now Senator Mike Lee's 2010 campaign for the United States Senate. Businessman Jeremy Johnson informed investigators that John Swallow, Lee's friend and now disgraced former Attorney General of Utah, requested he give thousands of dollars to various individuals who then donated that money to Mike Lee. Senator Lee's office released a statement claiming "at no time during or since the 2010 campaign was Sen. Lee or anyone associated with the Lee campaign aware of any unlawful contributions to the Lee campaign."
  • Federal investigators are looking into whether Governor Chris Christie's administration committed securities law violations by spending nearly $2 billion of Port Authority funds on a state owned bridge. It is illegal to spend Port Authority funds on state owned infrastructure, but the Christie administration lobbied heavily to classify the bridge as an access road to the Lincoln Tunnel even though they are not connected. Investigators are attempting to determine if Governor Christie violated the Martin Act, which enables the state of New York to file suit if they feel Christie intentionally misled bond holders.
  • Shortly before Blackwater security guards killed seventeen unarmed civilians in Iraq, their top manager in the country got in a fight with a State Department investigator and threatened he could kill the investigator without any facing any consequence. Instead of scolding Blackwater for over reaching, American Embassy officials sided with the company and ordered the State Department investigators to leave Iraq. The investigators then wrote a prophetic report saying Blackwater felt they were above the law and that "management structures in place to manage and monitor our contracts in Iraq have become subservient to the contractors themselves.”
  • Glen Beck's radio show aired a sexist skit mocking the college rape epidemic to show that there is no rape problem at our universities nationwide. Beck's skit accused the President of expanding the definition of rape for political purposes and brought on a man in a wig to poke fun of all the ways a woman claims she was raped. The skit was originally aired a week before a college student went on a shooting rampage over his inability to get a girlfriend, but was re-aired shortly after the shooting because Beck wanted to rebut those who were saying that there was a problem with violence against women in America.
  • The House Energy and Commerce Committee conducted a survey of health insurance companies which was designed to produce results unfavorable to the Obama Administration and not reflect the actual enrollment numbers for Obamacare. The survey only asked companies to provide numbers of individuals who have paid their first premium and those who have not, but made the companies produce their results two weeks before the deadline for millions of individuals to make their first payments.
  • Legal experts say Justice Antonin Scalia erred in his dissent in the 6-2 decision Tuesday to uphold the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to regulate coal pollution that moves across state lines. The Reagan-appointed jurist argued that the majority's decision was inconsistent with a unanimous 2001 ruling which he mistakenly said shot down EPA efforts to consider costs when setting regulations.
  • In the summer of 2013, according to multiple sources, Shepard Smith approached Fox News president Roger Ailes about publicly coming out. The anchor was eager to finally acknowledge his sexuality. Ailes informed Smith that the network’s famously conservative audience would not tolerate a gay news anchor. Ailes’ answer was definitive: Smith could not say he’s gay. The discussion worried enough Fox executives to prompt Smith’s removal, in September 2013, from the channel’s prime-time lineup. According to a Fox insider with direct knowledge of negotiations, Smith’s desire to come out was a large factor in the dramatic move.
  • For 55 minutes, Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy spoke to a clutch of supporters about his views on the troubled state of America — the overreaching federal government, the harassment of Western ranchers, the societal upheaval caused by abortion, even musing about whether slavery was really all that bad. All the while, the Bureau of Land Management rangers who, acting on a court order, tried to confiscate 500 cattle owned by Mr. Bundy, who has been illegally grazing his herd on public land since 1993. During Cliven's speech, he told a story that revealed his true, racist side. Many Republican supporters are now withdrawing their support due to the extreme comment. Here is what he had to say. “I want to tell you one more thing I know about the Negro,” he said. Mr.
  • A judge seated a grand jury in Austin last week to consider whether Texas Governor Rick Perry, who is weighing another run for the White House, abused his power when he carried out a threat to veto $7.5 million in state funding for public corruption prosecutors last summer. Aides to Perry say he legally exercised his veto power. Others say Perry was abusing his state office and is finally getting his comeuppance. The grand jury is impaneled for three months. In the original complaint, McDonald accused Perry of breaking laws related to coercion of a public servant and abuse of official capacity.
  • Right wing terrorist Frazier Glenn Miller has been named as the only suspect in the April 13, 2014 Kansas City shooting that killed 3 people. The shooting was specifically targeted at the Jewish community. The suspect was reported yelling "Heil Hitler" numerous times during the the shooting and arrest.
  • Louisiana U.S. Representative Vance McAllister, who ran on a platform of Christian conservatism and family values, was caught passionately kissing a Congressional aide on videotape. McAllister admitted that it was him on the tape and asked for forgiveness from God, his family, staff, and constituents.