Conservative Controversies & Scandals

2014 Major Republican Scandals & Controversies

  • Republicans in Wisconsin unanimously voted to remove Bill Kramer as Assembly Majority Leader after he was accused of sexual harassment at a recent fundraiser and another woman accused him of harassment on a recent flight back to Wisconsin.
  • Ohio Gov. John Kasich signed two voting restriction laws that limits the eligibility of absentee ballots and cuts the early voting period for Federal elections. The law will make it more difficult for overseas military members to vote if they make a minor paperwork error. It also prohibits election workers from assisting voters unless they are disabled or illiterate, which could make it more difficult for senior citizens in nursing homes that are accustomed to receiving assistance from bipartisan teams that help them cast their ballots.
  • The Congressional Budget Office released a report that concluded a House GOP proposal to alter the definition of full time employment under the Affordable Care Act to 40 hours a week and exempt businesses from paying penalties if they don't offer their employees insurance would actually lead to one million individuals being dropped from their employer-sponsored insurance plans. The plan would also increase the deficit by $73 billion and increase the number of individuals seeking healthcare through Medicaid or the health insurance exchanges.
  • Shortly after his election, Governor Christie appointed two of his friends and political donors, John and Mary Kay Strangfeld, to the typically ceremonial positions of chairman and vice chairman at the Drumthwacket Foundation, a nonprofit that has restored and maintains the New Jersey Governors mansion. John Strangfeld is also the chairman of the insurance agency Prudential, a company that received a record-setting $250 million dollar tax incentive to move its Newark headquarters only a few blocks down the street. The number averages out to the taxpayers spending $527,000 per job that was created in the handout.
  • The Arizona State Senate voted along party lines on a bill that would sanction a private individuals and businesses the right to refuse service to any customer that violates their religious beliefs. The bill, which is widely viewed as giving legal permission for people to refuse service to gay and lesbian individuals, was quickly passed by the State House and now heads to Governor Jan Brewer. vetoed a similar piece of legislation last year.
  • Conservative columnist Brent Bozell's syndicated column was dropped by the Quad-City Times after it was reported Bozell had a ghostwriter write his column for years. Tim Graham, of the Bozell-founded Media Research Center, has been named as the ghostwriter of the column.
  • For the second time in as many months, Rand Paul has been accused of using the words of someone else without giving proper attribution. Paul and Cuccineli filed a lawsuit against the NSA, but much of the lawsuits verbiage was a carbon copy of former Reagan attorney Bruce Fein's words.
  • Conservative filmmaker James O'Keefe and his company have been sued by Daniel Francisco, a former employee of Project Veritas, for wrongful termination and breach of contract. Francisco alleges he was wrongfully terminated and 'defamed' by O'Keefe. He is also claiming that Project Veritas breached his contract by not paying him for his final week of employment.
  • Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the number four Republican in House leadership, is facing a House Ethics Committee investigation over allegations that she illegally combined campaign and Congressional funds to help her win her 2012 House leadership race. The Office Of Congressional Ethics recommended that the House Ethics Committee conduct a full investigation into the allegations and the committee reported that they will begin their preliminary investigation into the matter.
  • The National Republican Congressional Committee created multiple websites that were designed to trick democrats into donating for republican candidates. After the individual submitted their donation to who they thought was a democrat, they would receive an email from the NRCC thanking them for donating to help defeat democrats and President Obama.
  • Bill Gothard, the founder of the Institute in Basic Life Principles and religious right icon, has been relieved of his duties after being accused of harassing women working at his ministry and failing to report multiple child abuse cases to Child Protective Services. Billy Boring , Chairman of the Institute, released a statement saying Gothard "will not be involved in the operations of the ministry. The board of directors will be prayerfully appointing interim leadership.”
  • The state Ethics Commission has approved Governor Chris Christie's recommendation of Susana Espasa Guerrero, a longtime loyalist and former employee of the Governor, to head the ethics panel that will investigate the bridge closure scandal the Governor finds himself in. Ms. Guerrero has also worked with every single individual who has been subpoenaed in the case.
  • Todd Starnes, a Fox News regular, pushed a story about a young female in California that was forced to take her seat when she began reading a Bible verse about the meaning of Christmas to her fellow classmates. The accusations, which Starnes claimed were confirmed by Advocates for Faith and Freedom caused a major stir on the network, but they have turned out to not be true whatsoever. The girls teacher strongly rebutted the accusations, as has the schools principal who claims that the young girls claims were misrepresented for political gain by Starnes and the Advocates for Faith and Freedom.
  • Representative Steve Stockman staged a one man walk out of President Obama's State of the Union speech because he could not stand to listen to President Obama "abuse his Constitutional powers" any further. The Congressman went on to accuse President Obama's use of executive orders as a "wholesale violation of his oath of office and a disqualifying offense."
  • New York Republican Michael Grimm physically threatened to break a reporter in half after he was asked a question regarding an ongoing investigation into his campaign finance activities. Grimm later claimed that he became upset because the reporter was not supposed to ask him anything regarding his current scandal and was only supposed to ask him about the President's State of the Union address.
  • A former prosecutor in New Jersey has come forward to claim that he was fired after refusing to drop a criminal case against a friend of Governor Chris Christie. Ben Barlyn, the former prosecutor in question, claimed that he was fired shortly after filing multiple charges against Republican Sheriff Deborah Trout. He was replaced with a Christie ally that quickly dropped the charges. Mr. Barlyn has petitioned the state Attorney General's office to release grand jury testimony that he says will back up his accusations.
  • A public school in Louisiana has been sued by a Buddhist family that claims their child was routinely and systemically harassed by the child's teacher, officials, and even the school superintendent. The child claims that he was made fun of by his teacher, had religious based questions marked incorrectly on his tests, and he had to take part in official prayers directed by the principal and teachers. The parents also claim the superintendent told them that they lived in the bible belt and that they would just have to accept the status quo.
  • Senator McCain was formally censured by the Arizona Republican Party because his voting record in the Senate was considered too liberal by the members. The censure resolution needed the signature of twenty percent of attendees to be able to go to the floor for a vote and was then approved by a voice-vote of the entire committee.
  • The Republican Party of Iowa posted a chart on their Facebook page that mocked racism and gave instructions on how to determine if someone was indeed a racist. The chart instructed its readers how to determine if someone was racist by taking their skin color and whether you like them in to account. The post has since been removed, but not before the posting was picked up by numerous outlets.
  • Former track star Carl Lewis claims that Governor Christie personally intervened and dissuaded him from launching a bid to run for an open state Senate seat that the Governor's friend was running for. Lewis claims that Governor Christie told him that "I'm going to come after you" and threatened to drop plans to appoint him as the states fitness ambassador if he ran against his friend. Governor Christie has denied the accusation by Lewis.