Conservative Controversies & Scandals

2014 Major Republican Scandals & Controversies

  • Glen Beck's radio show aired a sexist skit mocking the college rape epidemic to show that there is no rape problem at our universities nationwide. Beck's skit accused the President of expanding the definition of rape for political purposes and brought on a man in a wig to poke fun of all the ways a woman claims she was raped. The skit was originally aired a week before a college student went on a shooting rampage over his inability to get a girlfriend, but was re-aired shortly after the shooting because Beck wanted to rebut those who were saying that there was a problem with violence against women in America.
  • The House Energy and Commerce Committee conducted a survey of health insurance companies which was designed to produce results unfavorable to the Obama Administration and not reflect the actual enrollment numbers for Obamacare. The survey only asked companies to provide numbers of individuals who have paid their first premium and those who have not, but made the companies produce their results two weeks before the deadline for millions of individuals to make their first payments.
  • Legal experts say Justice Antonin Scalia erred in his dissent in the 6-2 decision Tuesday to uphold the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to regulate coal pollution that moves across state lines. The Reagan-appointed jurist argued that the majority's decision was inconsistent with a unanimous 2001 ruling which he mistakenly said shot down EPA efforts to consider costs when setting regulations.
  • In the summer of 2013, according to multiple sources, Shepard Smith approached Fox News president Roger Ailes about publicly coming out. The anchor was eager to finally acknowledge his sexuality. Ailes informed Smith that the network’s famously conservative audience would not tolerate a gay news anchor. Ailes’ answer was definitive: Smith could not say he’s gay. The discussion worried enough Fox executives to prompt Smith’s removal, in September 2013, from the channel’s prime-time lineup. According to a Fox insider with direct knowledge of negotiations, Smith’s desire to come out was a large factor in the dramatic move.
  • Bobby Harrell is trying to shut down the Grand Jury investigating him for corruption by trying to get the case moved to the House Ethics Committee. Ethics advocates say "The House Ethics Committee is nothing but a fraud," said John Crangle, who leads Common Cause South Carolina, in an interview with The Huffington Post. "It's never done anything. To send it to the House Ethics Committee is basically to deep-six it, which is exactly what Harrell would like to do."
  • For 55 minutes, Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy spoke to a clutch of supporters about his views on the troubled state of America — the overreaching federal government, the harassment of Western ranchers, the societal upheaval caused by abortion, even musing about whether slavery was really all that bad. All the while, the Bureau of Land Management rangers who, acting on a court order, tried to confiscate 500 cattle owned by Mr. Bundy, who has been illegally grazing his herd on public land since 1993. During Cliven's speech, he told a story that revealed his true, racist side. Many Republican supporters are now withdrawing their support due to the extreme comment. Here is what he had to say. “I want to tell you one more thing I know about the Negro,” he said. Mr.
  • A judge seated a grand jury in Austin last week to consider whether Texas Governor Rick Perry, who is weighing another run for the White House, abused his power when he carried out a threat to veto $7.5 million in state funding for public corruption prosecutors last summer. Aides to Perry say he legally exercised his veto power. Others say Perry was abusing his state office and is finally getting his comeuppance. The grand jury is impaneled for three months. In the original complaint, McDonald accused Perry of breaking laws related to coercion of a public servant and abuse of official capacity.
  • Just before 2 a.m. on April 21, Dane Eagle was arrested in Tallahassee on suspicion of DUI. Police first spotted him pulling out of a Taco Bell in his black SUV before he narrowly avoided hitting a median, then stopped in an intersection, veered into a curb and ran a traffic light, according to arrest documents. Eagle was booked and released.
  • Right wing terrorist Frazier Glenn Miller has been named as the only suspect in the April 13, 2014 Kansas City shooting that killed 3 people. The shooting was specifically targeted at the Jewish community. The suspect was reported yelling "Heil Hitler" numerous times during the the shooting and arrest.
  • Louisiana U.S. Representative Vance McAllister, who ran on a platform of Christian conservatism and family values, was caught passionately kissing a Congressional aide on videotape. McAllister admitted that it was him on the tape and asked for forgiveness from God, his family, staff, and constituents.
  • Breitbart News announced their intent to focus more on California politics by releasing an offensive and sexually suggestive advertisement that had the House Democratic leader on all fours in a nude colored bikini with her tongue hanging out of her mouth.
  • An Oklahoma state lawmaker admitted that he accidentally shot someone while out hunting last month. State Representative Steve Vaughan was out shooting and tried to hit a pheasant, but accidentally hit another hunter in the side of the head with his shotgun. Vaughan profusely apologized and expresses how terrible he feels about the incident.
  • Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant signed a vaguely worded 'religious liberty' bill which he says is meant to protect religious freedoms, but opponents claim is just another backdoor way to discriminate against gays and lesbians in the name of religious freedom. Right wing Christian organizations are cheering the move by saying the new law will 'prevent the Government from discriminating against religious exercise.'
  • Prosecutors charged former Wisconsin Assembly Majority Leader Bill Kramer on Friday with sexually assaulting a political aide three years ago following a Republican mixer. Kramer is charged with two counts of second-degree felony sexual assault. He faces up to $200,000 in fines and 80 years in prison if convicted on both charges. He is due to make an initial court appearance on April 14.
  • The Friends of Abe, Inc. (FOA) is a support and networking group for politically conservative members of the Hollywood elite. The organization was formed in 2004 by actor Gary Sinise. As of January 2012 the organization had more than 1800 members. Friends of Abe has spent three years trying to get tax-exempt 501(c)(3) status for their organization. After going an a campaign claiming the IRS was unfairly "targeting" them and playing various victim tactics, the IRS finally approved FOA to nonpartisan charity status.
  • Billionaire Mike Fernandez, co-chair of Rick Scott's campaign, resigned. Tensions had allegedly been building for weeks. The final straw came when high ranking campaign staffers were allegedly doing over-the-top, cartoonish Mexican accents while they were on their way to a Mexican restaurant according to campaign personnel.
  • Mark Driscoll used church funds to buy thousands of copies of his own book in an effort to push his book to the bestseller list. $200,000 changed hands and 6,000 books were ordered using 1,000 false addresses. This practice not illegal. Driscoll apologized for the behavior in a letter that was published on Reddit.
  • Representative Ryan relayed a story told to him by Wisconsin Department of Children and Families Secretary Eloise Anderson about a boy who received free lunch at school that gladly chose a bagged lunch over a free school lunch meal in an attempt to portray Democrats as offering children "full stomach and an empty soul." While the story received a hearty applause from his audience, it seems to have mirrored a story written in the book "An Invisible Thread." Once informed of this error, Ryan wrote on his Facebook page to apologize for "failing to verify the original source of the story."
  • House Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa cut off Ranking Member Elijah Cummings microphone during while Representative Cummings was trying to make a statement at the end of a hearing on the Internal Revenue Service's improper targeting of groups applying for tax-exempt status. Representative Cummings tried to ask a question before the hearing was adjourned, but Chairman Issa refused to let him make his full statement, cut off Representative Cummings microphone, and walked out of the room.
  • House Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa cut off Ranking Member Elijah Cummings microphone during while Representative Cummings was trying to make a statement at the end of a hearing on the Internal Revenue Service's improper targeting of groups applying for tax-exempt status. Representative Cummings tried to ask a question before the hearing was adjourned, but Chairman Issa refused to let him make his full statement, cut off Representative Cummings microphone, and walked out of the room.