Conservative Controversies & Scandals

2013 Republican Scandals & Controversies

  • Joseph Epstein of the Wall Street Journal recently penned an Op-Ed bemoaning the end of WASP, otherwise known as White, Anglo-Saxon Protestant, rule in America. Mr. Epstein listed a number of cases where the decline of WASP has harmed America, bemoaning the fact that colleges admit more black students and blamed the real estate boom and collapse on the decline of WASP.
  • Phil Robertson, the star of the A&E show "Duck Dynasty," has been suspended indefinitely after equating homosexuality and bestiality in a recent interview with GQ. Robertson, an unabashed christian conservative, claimed that homosexuality is just not "logical" and that once homosexuality is accepted the next thing we will have to accept is "bestiality, sleeping around with this woman and that woman and that woman and those men."
  • Georgia Governor Nathan Deal is under increasing pressure after both the United States Attorney's Office and the Federal Bureau of Investigations announced they have widened their criminal probe into the Governor's possible misuse of hundred's of thousands of campaign dollars. So far five current and former members of the state ethics committee have been issued subpoenas by the FBI and more are expected as the investigation proceeds forward.
  • Republican Study Committee Chairman Steve Scalise has fired the group's longtime executive director, Paul Teller, multiple sources told National Journal. The reason for the dismissal, according to sources familiar with the situation, is that Teller allegedly shared sensitive conversations between RSC members with outside advocacy groups, some of whom hold policy positions counter to the RSC. It's not the first time he's played both sides, according to several Republicans. In fact, they say Teller's firing was a long time coming. "This wasn't ideological. He leaked against RSC members all the time," said another senior GOP aide. "He worked against bills sponsored by members without the chairman knowing."
  • Jesse Ryan Loskarn, Senator Lamar Alexander's Chief of Staff, was arrested and charged with possession and distribution of underage pornography on Wednesday. Mr. Loskarn was arrested after an investigation by the U.S. Postal Inspection Service concluded that there was enough probable cause to charge him with a crime. Senator Alexander claimed that he knew nothing of the investigation until shortly before the arrest and fired Loskarn after word of the charges was made public.
  • Governor Christie is embroiled in an interstate controversy with New York after a botched "traffic study" on one of the busiest bridges in the world ground traffic to a halt for miles. New York officials claim they were not notified of anything and many Democratic critics of the Governor claim that the sudden lane closures were retribution against the mayor of Fort Lee for refusing to endorse Christie in his reelection bid. Three of Governor Christie's appointees, including his former Deputy Chief of Staff, were charged with felonies. One has plead guilty and the other two are awaiting trial.
  • Arizona Governor Jan Brewer is under intense scrutiny after it was revealed that her Administration ignored over 6,000 reports of child abuse and neglect. The Governor took personal credit last year when she claimed that the Arizona Child Protective Services overhauled its outdated system to prioritize urgent calls, but what seemed to have happened is that the state just closed thousands of reports without ever investigating them.
  • Tallahassee, Fla., attorney Steven Andrews filed a new lawsuit against Florida Gov. Rick Scott on Monday, alleging that the Republican governor's administration failed to release public records, according to The Associated Press. Andrews, a frequent critic of Scott, filed separate lawsuits against the governor, Attorney General Pam Bondi and the Department of State. The lawsuits accuse the Scott administration of tampering with a top aide's calendar, using private email accounts for state business and stalling for more than 18 months to supply another aide's text messages. Bondi is alleged to have refused to release meeting notes kept on her iPad.
  • Rep. Steve Stockman (R-Texas) has failed to properly disclose his financial dealings as both a candidate and a congressman, the Houston Chronicle reported on 11/24. A continuing investigation of the representative's campaign finances shows that Stockman has failed to file federally required expense documents since his 2012 campaign; those that he did file were months late and only prompted more questions.
  • Trey Radel, a member of the United States House of Representatives from Florida, was charged with misdemeanor possession of cocaine stemming from an October 29 arrest in Washington D.C. Mr. Radel released a statement admitting he was an alcoholic and that he is seeking treatment. Speaker Boehner's office released a statement that attempted to distance itself from the unfolding situation, stating that members of congress are held to a high standard and that the controversy should be handled by the courts, Mr. Radel's family, and his constituents.
  • Former Vice President Dick Cheney waded in to the public spat between his two daughters over gay marriage by siding with Liz Cheney, who is against gay marriage rights, in the feud. Cheney and his wife released a statement supporting Liz and that she has always been a proponent of the "traditional definition of marriage." Mary Cheney and he wife claimed that Liz was on the wrong side of history.
  • On November 4, 2013, Cohen wrote a column about the film “12 Years a Slave”, in which he evinced personal ignorance of the history of slavery in the U.S. and a negative view of abolitionist writer Harriet Beecher Stowe. Shortly afterwards, on November 11, in the course of a column about New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, Cohen referred to the recent victory of Bill De Blasio as Mayor of New York and De Blasio's very successful wife, Chirlane McCray writing: "People with conventional views must repress a gag reflex when considering the mayor-elect of New York — a white man married to a black woman and with two biracial children.
  • A litany of recent reports that have surfaced regarding Senator Ted Cruz's college days have cast the junior Senator in a rather unflattering light, but this most recent one tops them all. One night after a leading performance in a school play at Harvard, Cruz stayed up all night drinking so much grain alcohol that he could not perform his part the next day. He was so out of it that he walked off the stage in the middle of his performance, forcing fellow cast members to improvise after the lead role abruptly left.
  • CBS has formally apologized and retracted its recent story detailing the story of Dylan Davies, a security contractor stationed in Benghazi at the time of the terrorist attacks against the American embassy, after information came out that he fabricated his entire story to "60 Minutes." Mr. Davies claimed that he heroically rushed to the scene of the terrorist attack, scaled a wall, and fought off an attacker. He also claimed that her personally viewed the slain ambassador Christopher Stevens body in the hospital. What CBS neglected to inform its viewers is that Mr. Davies wrote a book detailing his fabricated story, which has since been pulled from print.
  • The Canyon Independent School District, a school district in Texas, has been teaching their middle-school students a wildly discredited sexual abstinence curriculum that states sex before marriage is equivalent to being a used tooth-brush or a chewed-up piece of gum. "Reality Check," the curriculum in question, also teaches students that “it can be physically, emotionally, and financially harmful” if someone has sex before marriage and that any type of sexual activity before marriage means you are no longer a virgin. The fact that this was being taught is one thing, but parents were intentionally kept in the dark about the curriculum by the district administration.
  • Ken Cuccinelli is exhibiting a new low in politics after refusing to telephone Governor-elect Terry McAuliffe to offer his congratulations and personal concession. It is customary for the losing party to contact the winner and concede after an election has been called, but Cuccinelli has refused to do so.
  • Children in Albuquerque, New Mexico were thrust into a heated abortion debate after someone attached anti-choice cards to the candy they passed out. The cards read “I am not a clump of cells,” “I am a human being,” and “53 million killed.” No one has claimed responsibility for the ads, but the timing of the ads are suspect because the city is holding a vote on November 19th to become the first city to ban abortions after 20 weeks.
  • More than 100 condo buyers sued Trump after they lost millions of dollars in deposits they'd put down on apartments in Trump Ocean Resort Baja, a planned luxury hotel, which was never built. It was found out later that he had only licensed his name to the project. He was accused of fraud and violating federal disclosure laws. The case was settled out of court.
  • An unemployed motorcycle mechanic walked into Los Angeles International Airport and opened fire, killing one TSA agent and wounding six more before he was shot by airport police. The suspect, Paul Ciancia, had a handwritten note on his person that stated he wanted to "instill fear in their [TSA] traitorous minds," and that he was doing this act of terrorism consciously. Ciancia also wrote of a New World Order and lamenting a fiat currency
  • Senator Rand Paul has found himself in an uncomfortable position after Rachel Maddow accused him of plagiarism during a speech that he recently gave at Liberty University. Mr. Paul was attempting to drive home a point about eugenics when he quoted nearly verbatim multiple lines from the Wikipedia page of the movie "Gattaca." After Ms. Maddow completed her report, Buzzfeed did some more research and found that this is not the first time that Mr. Paul seemed to borrow lines from Wikipedia pages. Senator Paul delivered a speech in June that borrowed lines from the Wikipedia page of the movie "Stand and Deliver."