Conservative Controversies & Scandals

Top\Worst Republican Scandals & Controversies

  • Donald Trump signed an Executive Order that banned anyone from seven predominately Muslim countries from entering the United States regardless if they are current Visa holders. The seven countries are Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The order put a halt to accepting any refugees seeking asylum, no matter their country of origin, for 120 days. Update: A Federal District Court put an injunction on the ban. Update No. 2: Trump amended the ban and took Iraq off the list. Update No. 3: The Supreme Court allowed a portion of the ban to go into effect pending a full hearing on the ban in its term beginning in October.
  • Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigative team is investigating Donald Trump for potentially obstructing justice once he fired former FBI Director James Comey. Mueller's team will be interviewing Daniel Coats, the current director of national intelligence, Mike Rogers, head of the National Security Agency, and Rogers’s recently departed deputy, Richard Ledgett to help determine if Trump interfered in Comey's FBI investigation and whether he obstructed justice if he did interfere. Update: Donald Trump confirmed in a early morning tweet that he was under investigation.
  • Donald Trump made up the word "covfefe" on a tweet that he sent out at 12:06am while complaining about the negative press he receives. Trump tweeted again six hours later and asked his followers to figure out the definition of "covfefe," which isn't an actual word.
  • Donald Trump shared the highest level of classified information about the Islamic State with the Russian Foreign Minister and Ambassador during a meeting with the two in the oval office. The individual who provided the information did not give the Trump White House permission to share it with Russia and it is very possible that the source is now compromised. Government officials, speaking confidentially, claimed that the information Trump passed along was so secret that it hasn't been shared with our closest allies.
  • Donald Trump pressured former FBI Director James Comey to end an investigation into Michael Flynn, telling Mr. Comey that he "hopes you can let this go," according to a recently released memo Comey wrote immediately after the conversation. It is illegal, even for the President of the United States, to impede an investigation being conducted by the Department of Justice or the FBI.
  • Donald Trump fired FBI Director James Comey "with cause" because Trump said he mishandled the investigation into Hillary Clinton's e-mail server. That explanation defies logic considering Trump praised Comey for his handling of the investigation back in early November. The real reason Trump fired Comey may have more to do with the fact that Comey and the FBI have been investigating Trump and his associates ties to Russia and whether or not they colluded with the Russian government during the 2016 Presidential election.
  • Donald Trump told a Reuters journalist that he thought being President would be easier and that he missed his old life of luxury. Trump said that he "loved [his] previous life. I had so many things going. This is more work than in my previous life. I thought it would be easier."
  • Bill O'Reilly was accused of sexual harassment by at least five women and has settled five sexual harassment lawsuits out of court totaling $13 million. The lawsuits span a decade, but two of the accusations came to light in lawsuits against Fox News CEO Roger Ailes. Update: 21st Century Fox fired Bill O'Reilly effective immediately.
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions had two meetings with the Russian ambassador during the 2016 election season, neither of which he admitted to during his confirmation hearing. When answering a question from Senator Al Fanken about potential collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian officials Sessions said: "I have been called a surrogate at a time or two in that campaign and I did not have communications with the Russians.” A spokesperson for the Attorney General said that "[t]here was absolutely nothing misleading about his answer." Update: Sessions reported that he has decided to recuse himself from any investigation involving Russia's involvement in the 2016 Presidential campaign.
  • National Security Adviser Michael Flynn had a phone call with a high ranking Russian official during the Presidential transition and then lied about the topics that were discussed on the call to then Vice-President elect Mike Pence. Flynn claimed that he didn't discuss easing sanctions against Russia after Trump was sworn into office, but then backtracked and said that he couldn't remember if he did. Officials in the Justice Department warned the incoming Trump administration that Flynn was especially prone to blackmail, but those warnings were ignored. Update: Flynn has resigned from his position as National Security Adviser.
  • Donald Trump has been sued by students of his now defunct "University" who accuse him of running a fraudulent scheme to get as much money from them as possible. Trump University is accused of using strong arm tactics that encourage the elderly and uneducated to take out massive amounts of debt with the promise of future financial gains. Trump University was in fact never a accredited university at all, but in fact it was a company that purported to be selling Trump’s secret insights into how to make money in real estate. **Update** Donald Trump settled the case out of court and has agreed to pay $25 million to the plaintiffs.
  • A woman has come forward and accused Donald Trump of sliding his hands underneath her mini-skirt and of touching her vagina through her underwear at a Manhattan social club in the early 1990's. The woman said she immediately told friends who corroborated her version of the incident to the Washington Post.
  • Dozens of high ranking Republican Senators, House Members, and Governors have called for Donald Trump's resignation after it was reported that Trump was recorded on audio tape bragging about being able to kiss and grope women against their will because he said that "when you’re a star, they let you do it.” In the tape he also discussed a failed attempt to have sex with a married women and expressed exasperation for being turned down even after he "moved on her very heavily."
  • Alabama governor, Robert Bentley was asked to leave by the First Baptist Church of Tuscaloosa, where he was once a deacon, after admitting to inappropriate sexual conversations with a top staffer, Rebekah Mason, who also attended the church, and had to leave as well.
  • The National Inquirer published a story accusing Senator Ted Cruz of having multiple and ongoing extramarital affairs. Senator Cruz refuted the allegations, but multiple Cruz opponents on both sides of the political aisle have been pushing these accusations for months.
  • When it came to the handling of frequent protests at his rallies, Trump said he was tired of "political correctness." After watching a protester fight with rally-goers, Trump said that it was " really amazing to watch." As one protester was being forcefully ejected ,Trump said "Try not to hurt him. If you do I'll defend you in court."
  • Far right militiamen took over the headquarters of a remote National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon to protest the imprisonment of a rancher and his son who were convicted of illegally setting fire to Federal lands. The militiamen insist they will occupy the refuge indefinitely.
  • During oral arguments at a Supreme Court case on affirmative action and the use of race in college admissions, Justice Antonin Scalia suggested that black students are being "pushed into schools that are too advanced for them" and that they should take a “slower track” in their education.
  • Two Fox News contributors, Ralph Peters and Stacey Dash, were suspended after they said curse words while criticizing President Obama's approach to fighting ISIS. Peters called the President "a total pussy" and Dash said she felt the President "could give a shit" [sic].
  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell removed language guaranteeing a permanent extension of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act. The law provides health coverage to 9/11 first responders, but is due to run out of money at the end of the month. Senator McConnell removed a permanent extension of the law after Senate Democrats refused to agree to ending a longstanding ban on U.S. oil exports.