Conservative Controversies & Scandals

Top\Worst Republican Sex Scandals

  • Bill O'Reilly was accused of sexual harassment by at least five women and has settled five sexual harassment lawsuits out of court totaling $13 million. The lawsuits span a decade, but two of the accusations came to light in lawsuits against Fox News CEO Roger Ailes. Update: 21st Century Fox fired Bill O'Reilly effective immediately.
  • A woman has come forward and accused Donald Trump of sliding his hands underneath her mini-skirt and of touching her vagina through her underwear at a Manhattan social club in the early 1990's. The woman said she immediately told friends who corroborated her version of the incident to the Washington Post.
  • The National Inquirer published a story accusing Senator Ted Cruz of having multiple and ongoing extramarital affairs. Senator Cruz refuted the allegations, but multiple Cruz opponents on both sides of the political aisle have been pushing these accusations for months.
  • Senator David Vitter's former mistress has publicly accused him of pressuring her to get an abortion after he found out she was carrying his child. Wendy Ellis, the anti-abortion Senator's former mistress, said in a recent interview that the sitting Senator first denied that he was the child's father, but then pressured her to get an abortion after she convinced him that the baby was in fact his. Ms. Ellis passed a polygraph exam when the story of Vitter's alleged affair first broke back in 2007 and the polygraph expert confirmed her story appears to be legit. Senator Vitter refused to take the polygraph exam, but later admitted to committing a “serious sin” back in 2007. The baby was put up for adoption immediately after birth and Ms.
  • Louisiana U.S. Representative Vance McAllister, who ran on a platform of Christian conservatism and family values, was caught passionately kissing a Congressional aide on videotape. McAllister admitted that it was him on the tape and asked for forgiveness from God, his family, staff, and constituents.
  • A forthcoming book by Gabriel Sherman interviews a woman that worked with Roger Ailes in the 1980's who claims that Mr. Ailes offered her a pay raise in exchange for weekly sex with him whenever he would like. Randi Harrison, the woman in question, claims that Mr. Ailes said he would pay her an extra $100 per week if she would agree to the demand.
  • Pete Domenici, a former Republican Senator from New Mexico, recently came forward and admitted that he fathered a child out of wedlock back in the 1970's. Mr. Domenici issued an apology to the citizens of New Mexico asking for their forgiveness and for them to not judge him on this issue but his record for the state.
  • Dinesh D'Souza resigns after days of controversy over accusations of marital infidelity against D'Souza, who reportedly attended a recent event on Christian values with a woman who was not his his wife of 20 years and shared a hotel room with her.
  • The Senate Ethics committee has admonished Republican Sen. Tom Coburn over his involvement with a staffer to former Sen. John Ensign.
  • Politico reported that two female employees had complained about inappropriate behavior by Cain during his tenure at the National Restaurant Association (1996-mid 1999). The women reportedly accepted financial settlements from the association which barred them from discussing their allegations further. Cain's campaign initially refused comment,but subsequently acknowledged that the accusations had been made. Cain strongly denied any impropriety, stating: "I have never sexually harassed anyone and those accusations are totally false."
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver announced their separation after 25 years of marriage, with Shriver moving out of the couple's Brentwood mansion. The Los Angeles Times revealed that Schwarzenegger had fathered a child ten years earlier with an employee in their household. The household staff member was employed by the family for 20 years and retired in January. Shriver left their mansion after Schwarzenegger acknowledged the infidelity and paternity of the child.
  • Chris Lee was discovered to be soliciting sex from a male-to-female trans-sexual using Craigslist. This does not appear to be a one time occurrance as a second transgender person has stepped forward. Chris Lee had resigned in January as these this sex scandal was becoming public.
  • In 2009, the Fellowship received media attention in connection with three Republicans politician members who reportedly engaged in extra-marital affairs. Two of them, Senator John Ensign, and South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford, were considering running for President in 2012. The affairs of Ensign and then-Congressman Chip Pickering, R-Miss, took place while they were living at the C Street Center.
  • Ensign admitted extramarital affair with female member of his campaign staff
  • Sanford had an extramarital affair with a woman from Argentina
  • In early July 2007, Vitter's phone number was included in a published list of phone records of Pamela Martin and Associates, a company owned and run by Deborah Jeane Palfrey, also known as the "D.C. Madam", convicted by the U.S. government for running a prostitution service. Hustler identified the phone number and contacted Vitter's office to ask about his connection to Palfrey. The following day, Vitter issued a written statement in which he took responsibility for his sin and asked for forgiveness. On July 16, 2007, after a week of self-imposed seclusion, Vitter emerged and called a news conference. Standing next to his wife, Vitter asked the public for forgiveness. Following Vitter's remarks, Wendy Vitter, his wife, spoke. Both refused to answer any questions.
  • The Larry Craig scandal was an incident that began on June 11, 2007, with the arrest of Larry Craig—who at the time was a Senator from Idaho—for lewd conduct in a men's restroom at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Craig later entered a guilty plea to a lesser charge of disorderly conduct. As a result of the controversy surrounding his arrest, subsequent guilty plea, and pressure from his fellow Republicans, Senator Craig announced his intention to resign from the Senate at a news conference. After failing to withdraw his guilty plea, on October 4, 2007, Craig released a statement refusing to resign as senator for Idaho.
  • The Mark Foley scandal, which broke in late September 2006, centers on soliciting e-mails and sexually suggestive instant messages sent by Mark Foley, a Republican Congressman from Florida, to teenaged boys who had formerly served as congressional pages. Investigation was closed by the FDLE on September 19, 2008 citing insufficient evidence to pursue criminal charges as both "Congress and Mr. Foley denied us access to critical data,” said FDLE Commissioner Gerald Bailey. The scandal has grown to encompass the response of Republican congressional leaders to previous complaints about Foley's contacts with the pages and inconsistencies in the leaders' public statements.
  • O'Reilly was accused of making "disgusting" phone calls and remarks to Andrea Mackris an associate producer on the "The O'Reilly Factor." O'Reilly's alleged remarks included telling Mackris she should use a vibrator and regaling her with tales of threesomes with Swedish stewardesses and stories of his "amazing" endowment. Mackris claims he made three lewd phone calls to her since August in which he described fantasies involving her and sex acts he would perform on her. She said he was clearly pleasuring himself as he spoke.
  • NPR's Supreme Court correspondent Nina Totenberg received a leaked Judiciary Committee/FBI report that a former colleague of Thomas, University of Oklahoma law school professor Anita Hill, accused him of making unwelcome sexual comments to her when the two worked together at the Department of Education and EEOC. On October 11, 1991, Hill was called to testify during the hearing. She sought to emphasize the inappropriate nature of the alleged behavior, rather than focusing on whether it was illegal or not, but said that in her view it was indeed illegal, adding that it might not "rise to the level" of illegal sexual harassment.