Conservative Controversies & Scandals

Top\Worst Republican Scandals

  • Donald Trump signed an Executive Order that banned anyone from seven predominately Muslim countries from entering the United States regardless if they are current Visa holders. The seven countries are Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The order put a halt to accepting any refugees seeking asylum, no matter their country of origin, for 120 days. Update: A Federal District Court put an injunction on the ban. Update No. 2: Trump amended the ban and took Iraq off the list. Update No. 3: The Supreme Court allowed a portion of the ban to go into effect pending a full hearing on the ban in its term beginning in October.
  • Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigative team is investigating Donald Trump for potentially obstructing justice once he fired former FBI Director James Comey. Mueller's team will be interviewing Daniel Coats, the current director of national intelligence, Mike Rogers, head of the National Security Agency, and Rogers’s recently departed deputy, Richard Ledgett to help determine if Trump interfered in Comey's FBI investigation and whether he obstructed justice if he did interfere. Update: Donald Trump confirmed in a early morning tweet that he was under investigation.
  • Donald Trump pressured former FBI Director James Comey to end an investigation into Michael Flynn, telling Mr. Comey that he "hopes you can let this go," according to a recently released memo Comey wrote immediately after the conversation. It is illegal, even for the President of the United States, to impede an investigation being conducted by the Department of Justice or the FBI.
  • Donald Trump fired FBI Director James Comey "with cause" because Trump said he mishandled the investigation into Hillary Clinton's e-mail server. That explanation defies logic considering Trump praised Comey for his handling of the investigation back in early November. The real reason Trump fired Comey may have more to do with the fact that Comey and the FBI have been investigating Trump and his associates ties to Russia and whether or not they colluded with the Russian government during the 2016 Presidential election.
  • Bill O'Reilly was accused of sexual harassment by at least five women and has settled five sexual harassment lawsuits out of court totaling $13 million. The lawsuits span a decade, but two of the accusations came to light in lawsuits against Fox News CEO Roger Ailes. Update: 21st Century Fox fired Bill O'Reilly effective immediately.
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions had two meetings with the Russian ambassador during the 2016 election season, neither of which he admitted to during his confirmation hearing. When answering a question from Senator Al Fanken about potential collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian officials Sessions said: "I have been called a surrogate at a time or two in that campaign and I did not have communications with the Russians.” A spokesperson for the Attorney General said that "[t]here was absolutely nothing misleading about his answer." Update: Sessions reported that he has decided to recuse himself from any investigation involving Russia's involvement in the 2016 Presidential campaign.
  • National Security Adviser Michael Flynn had a phone call with a high ranking Russian official during the Presidential transition and then lied about the topics that were discussed on the call to then Vice-President elect Mike Pence. Flynn claimed that he didn't discuss easing sanctions against Russia after Trump was sworn into office, but then backtracked and said that he couldn't remember if he did. Officials in the Justice Department warned the incoming Trump administration that Flynn was especially prone to blackmail, but those warnings were ignored. Update: Flynn has resigned from his position as National Security Adviser.
  • Donald Trump has been sued by students of his now defunct "University" who accuse him of running a fraudulent scheme to get as much money from them as possible. Trump University is accused of using strong arm tactics that encourage the elderly and uneducated to take out massive amounts of debt with the promise of future financial gains. Trump University was in fact never a accredited university at all, but in fact it was a company that purported to be selling Trump’s secret insights into how to make money in real estate. **Update** Donald Trump settled the case out of court and has agreed to pay $25 million to the plaintiffs.
  • A woman has come forward and accused Donald Trump of sliding his hands underneath her mini-skirt and of touching her vagina through her underwear at a Manhattan social club in the early 1990's. The woman said she immediately told friends who corroborated her version of the incident to the Washington Post.
  • Alabama governor, Robert Bentley was asked to leave by the First Baptist Church of Tuscaloosa, where he was once a deacon, after admitting to inappropriate sexual conversations with a top staffer, Rebekah Mason, who also attended the church, and had to leave as well.
  • The National Inquirer published a story accusing Senator Ted Cruz of having multiple and ongoing extramarital affairs. Senator Cruz refuted the allegations, but multiple Cruz opponents on both sides of the political aisle have been pushing these accusations for months.
  • Senator Marco Rubio appears to have broken Senate ethics rules after he solicited campaign donations on Federal property. Mr. Rubio was being interviewed by Fox News' Neil Cavuto from the Russell Senate Office Building when he directly appealed for his supporters to go to his campaign website and donate funds to his campaign. This direct appeal is in violation of Senate ethics rules that prohibit any member from "receiv[ing] or solicit[ing] campaign contributions in any federal building."
  • Dr. Ben Carson appears to have broken campaign finance law meant to restrict a candidate from having any corporation pay for a candidates expenses by using checks or in-kind giving them any goods or services. Mr. Carson recently suspended his campaign to promote his new book, but before doing so he spoke at the National Press Club to promote it. This in and of itself is not illegal, but the fact that his publishing company paid for the candidates traveling and other expenses for him to speak there is skirting on the edges of breaking the law. Carson's campaign denies any wrongdoing, but the law is very clear. Campaign finance laws mandate that candidates "may not accept contributions made from the general treasury funds of corporations, labor organizations or national banks.
  • Senator David Vitter's former mistress has publicly accused him of pressuring her to get an abortion after he found out she was carrying his child. Wendy Ellis, the anti-abortion Senator's former mistress, said in a recent interview that the sitting Senator first denied that he was the child's father, but then pressured her to get an abortion after she convinced him that the baby was in fact his. Ms. Ellis passed a polygraph exam when the story of Vitter's alleged affair first broke back in 2007 and the polygraph expert confirmed her story appears to be legit. Senator Vitter refused to take the polygraph exam, but later admitted to committing a “serious sin” back in 2007. The baby was put up for adoption immediately after birth and Ms.
  • Representative Aaron Schock is under investigation for improper use of taxpayer funds on a host of expenditures ranging from a lavish office themed after the PBS series Downton Abbey to billing the taxpayer for multiple vacations and other events. The Office of Congressional Ethics has opened an investigation into Mr. Schock and will report it's finding tot he House Ethics Committee. Representative Schock is already being investigated by the House Ethics Committee for allegedly soliciting contributions for an independent expenditure-only political committee in excess of $5,000 per donor. Update: Aaron Schock announced that he will be resigning from office on 3/31/2015
  • Former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell and his wife were charged in Federal Court for illegally accepting thousands of dollars in gifts, vacations, and loans from businessman Jonnie R. Williams Sr. in exchange for special treatment from the Governor. McDonnell is the first Governor to face federal charges in Virginia's long history. Update: Governor McDonnell was convicted on 11 counts. He will be sentenced on January 6th, 2015.
  • A former aide to Representative Frank Farenthold has sued the congressman and his office staff for creating a hostile work environment and gender discrimination. The former aide accused the congressman of making sexual comments about her and claimed he is regularly drunk on the job, which caused him to say a plethora of inappropriate things. She is seeking an unspecified amount of money for lost pay and emotional distress.
  • Representative Don Young has been ordered to repay $60,000 in illegally spent campaign donations he received over a period of twelve years. Young was found to have violated House ethics rules by illegally using campaign funds to go on fifteen trips to hunting lodges during that time. The Ethics Committee found that Young used more than $30,000 of his own campaigns funds and $28,000 in gifts he failed to disclose in his annual financial disclosures.
  • Federal investigators are looking into whether Governor Chris Christie's administration committed securities law violations by spending nearly $2 billion of Port Authority funds on a state owned bridge. It is illegal to spend Port Authority funds on state owned infrastructure, but the Christie administration lobbied heavily to classify the bridge as an access road to the Lincoln Tunnel even though they are not connected. Investigators are attempting to determine if Governor Christie violated the Martin Act, which enables the state of New York to file suit if they feel Christie intentionally misled bond holders.
  • A major political donor under indictment in Utah has admitted to laundering thousands of dollars in donations to now Senator Mike Lee's 2010 campaign for the United States Senate. Businessman Jeremy Johnson informed investigators that John Swallow, Lee's friend and now disgraced former Attorney General of Utah, requested he give thousands of dollars to various individuals who then donated that money to Mike Lee. Senator Lee's office released a statement claiming "at no time during or since the 2010 campaign was Sen. Lee or anyone associated with the Lee campaign aware of any unlawful contributions to the Lee campaign."