Conservative Controversies & Scandals

Republican Scandals

  • The commission Donald Trump set up to investigate the non-existent voter fraud problem in America asked all fifty states to give them confidential and sensitive voter information. The commission asked states to turn over the "dates of birth, political party (if recorded in your state), last four digits of social security number if available, voter history (elections voted in) from 2006 onward, active/inactive status, cancelled status, information regarding any felony convictions, information regarding voter registration in another state, information regarding military status, and overseas citizen information."
  • Donald Trump signed an Executive Order that banned anyone from seven predominately Muslim countries from entering the United States regardless if they are current Visa holders. The seven countries are Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The order put a halt to accepting any refugees seeking asylum, no matter their country of origin, for 120 days. Update: A Federal District Court put an injunction on the ban. Update No. 2: Trump amended the ban and took Iraq off the list. Update No. 3: The Supreme Court allowed a portion of the ban to go into effect pending a full hearing on the ban in its term beginning in October.
  • Donald Trump threatened former FBI Director Jim Comey in an early morning tweet to not talk to the press because there could be secret records of him speaking with Trump. Trump tweeted "James Comey better hope that there are no "tapes" of our conversations before he starts leaking to the press!" Update: Donald Trump admitted that he did not have any tapes of his conversations with James Comey.
  • White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer forced the press to turn off all audio and video devices before holding the daily press briefing and instead only allowed them to write down everything on paper.
  • Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigative team is investigating Donald Trump for potentially obstructing justice once he fired former FBI Director James Comey. Mueller's team will be interviewing Daniel Coats, the current director of national intelligence, Mike Rogers, head of the National Security Agency, and Rogers’s recently departed deputy, Richard Ledgett to help determine if Trump interfered in Comey's FBI investigation and whether he obstructed justice if he did interfere. Update: Donald Trump confirmed in a early morning tweet that he was under investigation.
  • Donald Trump seemed to confirm that he was under investigation for obstruction of justice during an early morning tweet storm lambasting the FBI investigation into his 2016 campaign and its potential dealings with the Russian government. Trump tweeted: "They [the FBI] made up a phony collusion with the Russians story, found zero proof, so now they go for obstruction of justice on the phony story. Nice"
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions failed to disclose that he had two dinners with a Russian lobbyist during the 2016 Presidential campaign while under oath. When asked if he had any “any contacts with any representative, including any American lobbyist or agent of any Russian company” during the 2016 campaign he responded "I don't believe so" and didn't disclose the two dinners with Richard Burt, a former U.S. ambassador to Germany who now lobbies for a pipeline company owned by the Russian government.
  • Donald Trump demanded former FBI Director James Comey pledge his loyalty to him during a private dinner less than a week after Trump's inauguration. Comey refused and simply pledged to always be honest with Mr. Trump. Trump didn't accept that at first and brought the issue up at least twice more during the dinner. Update: Former FBI Director James Comey swore under oath during a Senate hearing that Donald Trump did, in fact, ask him to pledge his loyalty.
  • Donald Trump's sons, Eric and Donald Jr., went on "Good Morning America" to promote a new hotel chain in Mississippi that is based off his campaign slogan. The chain, "American Idea,” is opening three hotels in the state that overwhelmingly voted for their dad, but the two sons insist they aren't trying to profit off their fathers Presidency.
  • Jared Kushner, Donald Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, asked Russian Ambassador Sergei Kislyak if he was willing to set up a secret communications channel with the Kremlin and if they could use Russian diplomatic facilities within the United States.
  • Donald Trump physically shoved the Prime Minister of Montenegro aside so he could be in the front row of a photo being taken at a NATO summit in Brussels, Belgium. Trump was towards the middle of the pack of the group of leaders from NATO nations when he put his hands on Prime Minister Dusko Markovic and shoved him aside.
  • Donald Trump asked the nations two top national intelligence officials to publicly refute that he or his campaign colluded with Russia in order to win the 2016 Presidential election. Trump asked the director of national intelligence, Daniel Coats, and to Adm. Michael S. Rogers, the director of the National Security Agency, to deny that there was any evidence of collusion between his campaign and Russia, but both refused to do so.
  • Former National Security Michael Flynn apparently took money from Russian government officials and then didn't disclose it to government officials. It is felony to receive money from a foreign government and then fail to disclose it. Update: Michael Flynn has invoked his 5th Amendment right and is refusing to provide documents that the Senate Intelligence Committee subpoenaed.
  • House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy privately claimed that he believed Donald Trump was being paid by Russian President Vladimir Putin during a meeting with his fellow GOP House leaders. The recorded conversation caught McCarthy saying “There’s two people I think Putin pays: [Rep. Dana] Rohrabacher and Trump.” Speaker Paul Ryan immediately interjected and stopped the conversation from proceeding.
  • Six federal law enforcement agencies are conducting an investigation into whether Donald Trump and his campaign illegally accepted money from the Russian government. Trump's campaign is being investigated for taking money that was supposed to be given to Russian-American pensioners and instead funneling it to hackers who released stolen information that was damaging to Hillary Clinton's campaign. Update: FBI Director James Comey publicly confirmed that there is an ongoing investigation into Trump's campaign and even Trump himself concerning their interactions with the Russian government during the Presidential campaign. Update 2: Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as special counsel for the Russia investigation.
  • Donald Trump pressured former FBI Director James Comey to end an investigation into Michael Flynn, telling Mr. Comey that he "hopes you can let this go," according to a recently released memo Comey wrote immediately after the conversation. It is illegal, even for the President of the United States, to impede an investigation being conducted by the Department of Justice or the FBI.
  • Donald Trump met with Sergey Kislyak, the individual at the heart of a swirling scandal concerning Trump's 2016 Presidential campaign and potential collusion with the Russian government, without notifying the press or including him in the official readout of the meeting that was supposed to be a bilateral meeting between Trump and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov. The public only found out that Kislyak was in the meeting because the Russian press, who were the only press allowed to capture the meeting, published images of Trump, Lavrov, and Kislyak smiling and laughing together.
  • Donald Trump fired FBI Director James Comey "with cause" because Trump said he mishandled the investigation into Hillary Clinton's e-mail server. That explanation defies logic considering Trump praised Comey for his handling of the investigation back in early November. The real reason Trump fired Comey may have more to do with the fact that Comey and the FBI have been investigating Trump and his associates ties to Russia and whether or not they colluded with the Russian government during the 2016 Presidential election.
  • Donald Trump issued an Executive Order that strips federal funds from any city that classifies itself as a "sanctuary city." These cities limit their cooperation with federal immigration officials concerning nonviolent undocumented immigrants. Update: A federal judge blocked the executive order pending litigation.
  • Judge Tim Nolan, who was Donald Trump's campaign manager for the state of Kentucky, was charged with human sex trafficking of a minor after an investigation concluded there was probable cause for his arrest and prosecution. Nolan was charged with one count of human trafficking for allegedly subjecting a minor under the age of 18 to commercial sexual activity, one count of unlawful transaction with a minor, and one count of giving alcohol to a minor.