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Army News & Opinion ArticlesDisplaying 20 Items
  • One night in 2012, Robert Bales—a soldier who joined the Army right after 9/11—gunned down 16 men, women, and children in their homes in rural Afghanistan. It was the most notorious American wartime atrocity in decades, a tragedy about which he has never spoken. Now, for the first time, Bales explains how he could do something so unimaginable—and how that one long night was actually ten violent years in the making
  • Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will face desertion charges, his lawyer tells NPR's David Welna. Bergdahl was captured by the Taliban in 2009, after he walked off his military outpost in southeastern Afghanistan. In a controversial move and five years after his capture, the Obama administration cut a deal with the Taliban, securing Bergdahl's release in exchange for the release of five Taliban detainees who were being held at the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba.
  • Seven Marines and four soldiers were presumed dead after an Army Black Hawk helicopter crashed during a nighttime training mission off the Florida coast, where some human remains have washed ashore, U.S. military officials said on Wednesday. A spokeswoman for the Eglin Air Force Base in north Florida did not provide details on the remains and officials did not immediately release information on what might have caused the crash.
  • The US Army made it more difficult to discharge openly serving transgender soldiers, USA Today reported. The Army now requires a top, senior civilian official to make discharge decisions, instead of leaving the choice to lower-level officers. Medical regulations allow the military to remove transgender soldiers once they're identified — somewhat similar to the now-eliminated ban on gay and lesbian soldiers, known as "Don't Ask, Don't Tell." This month, the US military agreed to hormone therapy for Chelsea Manning, a transgender soldier in prison for leaking secret US documents, a first for the Army.
  • Dear Aspiring Ranger, You've probably just graduated from high school and you've undoubtedly already signed an Option 40 contract guaranteeing you a shot at the Ranger indoctrination program (R.I.P.). If you make it through R.I.P. you'll surely be sent off to fight in the Global War on Terror. You'll be part of what I often heard called "the tip of the spear." The war you're heading into has been going on for a remarkably long time. Imagine this: you were five years old when I was first deployed to Afghanistan in 2002. Now I'm graying a bit, losing a little up top, and I have a family. Believe me, it goes faster than you expect. Once you get to a certain age, you can't help thinking about the decisions you made (or that, in a sense, were made for you) when you were younger.
  • "I am a United States Army General, and I lost the Global War on Terrorism." Those are the frank opening words of a new book by retired Army Lt. Gen. Daniel Bolger, Why We Lost: A General's Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. Bolger continues: "It's like Alcoholics Anonymous. Step one is admitting you have a problem. Well, I have a problem. So do my peers. And thanks to our problem, now all of America has a problem. To wit: two lost campaigns and a war gone awry." In over 500 pages, the retired three-star general describes the conflicting agendas that haunted both campaigns, as well as the difficulty of identifying the enemy and the looming specter of Vietnam.
  • A U.S. general was killed and more than a dozen people were wounded, including a German general, in the latest insider attack by a man believed to be an Afghan soldier, U.S., German and Afghan officials said on Tuesday. The slain general was identified in U.S. media reports as Major General Harold Greene, a senior officer with the international military command ISAF. He was the most senior U.S. military official killed in action overseas since the war in Vietnam, U.S. military officials said.
  • Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Wednesday defended the U.S. decision to trade five Taliban leaders at Guantanamo for war prisoner Bowe Bergdahl, insisting it was the right move but admitting failure to tell lawmakers hurt trust with Congress.
  • Appearing at the White House with the parents of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, President Obama said Saturday that he spoke for all Americans in sharing in the joy the family felt about their son's release from Taliban custody.
  • Less than five years after an Army psychiatrist went on a shooting rampage at Fort Hood, the military base has been shaken by another shooting
  • The top Army prosecutor for sexual assault cases has been suspended after a lawyer who worked for him recently reported he’d groped her and tried to kiss her at a sexual-assault legal conference more than two years ago. Two separate sources with knowledge of the situation told Stars and Stripes that the Army is investigating the allegations levied against Lt. Col. Joseph “Jay” Morse, who supervised the Army’s nearly two dozen special victim prosecutors — who are in charge of prosecuting sexual assault, domestic abuse and crimes against children.
  • The Department of Defense is poised to issue identification cards to same-sex spouses of military personnel starting Tuesday, a change that will give them the same access to housing and health care benefits as heterosexual spouses. The change comes after a California district court judge ruled last week that the military cannot deny spousal benefits to a lesbian Army veteran, due to the Supreme Court’s June 2013 ruling invalidating a key portion of the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act that had defined marriage as between a man and a woman.
  • Bradley Manning, the Army private convicted of leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the website WikiLeaks, was sentenced to 35 years in a military prison today.
  • Bradley Manning received a 35-year prison sentence on Wednesday, punishment for leaking troves of classified intelligence to the website WikiLeaks in 2010. The former Army private first class faced a maximum of 90 years in prison, and the prosecution was pushing aggressively for at least 60 years, meaning the final outcome was less harsh than it could have been.
  • Bradley Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison on Wednesday for releasing 700,000 documents about the United States' worldwide diplomacy and wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Manning was a 25-year-old Army private first class at the time of his arrest. He saw himself as an idealist acting to end the wars, and said in online chats with hacker Adrian Lamo that he was particularly concerned about the abuse of detainees in Iraq. No political or military higher-ups have ever been prosecuted for detainee abuse or torture in Iraq, Afghanistan or at Guantanamo Bay.
  • A military judge on Wednesday morning sentenced Army Pfc. Bradley Manning to 35 years in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. Manning, 25, was convicted last month of multiple charges, including violations of the Espionage Act for copying and disseminating the documents while serving as an intelligence analyst at a forward operating base in Iraq. He faced up to 90 years in prison.
  • Bradley Manning, the Army intelligence analyst who laid bare America's wars in Iraq and Afghanistan by covertly transmitting a massive trove of sensitive government documents to WikiLeaks, has been convicted on 19 of 21 charges, including 5 counts of espionage. He was found not guilty of aiding the enemy, the most serious and controversial charge laid against him.
  • The Army admitted Thursday to not only restricting access to The Guardian news website at the Presidio of Monterey, as reported in Thursday's Herald, but Armywide.
  • When World War I veterans returned from overseas, they were promised a cash bonus for their service — but they wouldn't get their money until 1945. Then the Great Depression struck. Desperate for relief, in 1932 a group of veterans from Portland, Ore., went to Washington to demand early payment. The protests led to violence — and eventually the GI Bill.
  • The newly appointed 26-year-old commander in chief of the French Army of Italy arrived at his headquarters in Nice on March 27, 1796. Scar-lipped Jean Mathieu Philibert SŽrurier, adventurous Pierre Franois Charles Augereau, and calculating AndrŽ MassŽna were all smirking as t...