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8th Amendment

8th AmendmentThe Bill of Rights, amendments to the United States Constitution proposed in 1789By: 1st United States Congress

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8th Amendment Text
Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.
  • The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that the Constitution’s ban on excessive fines applies to the states, an outcome that could help efforts to rein in police seizure of property from criminal suspects. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote the court’s opinion in favor of Tyson Timbs, of Marion, Indiana. Police seized Timbs’ $40,000 Land Rover when they arrested him for selling about $400 worth of heroin.
  • The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that the Constitution’s ban on excessive fines applies to the states, an outcome that could help efforts to rein in police seizure of property from criminal suspects. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote the court’s opinion in favor of Tyson Timbs, of Marion, Indiana. Police seized Timbs’ $40,000 Land Rover when they arrested him for selling about $400 worth of heroin.
  • Last week, Governor Mary Fallin of Oklahoma admitted that her state had misled the United States Supreme Court. In a brief statement issued hours before the scheduled execution of Richard Glossip, Fallin said that she was granting him a 37-day stay “due to the Department of Corrections having received potassium acetate as drug number three for the three-drug protocol.” The state last spring assured the Supreme Court that it stood ready to execute Glossip with a three-drug cocktail consisting of “midazolam, followed by vecuronium or recuronium bromide, then potassium chloride” a different drug with different effects.
  • Cormac Carney, a judge at the US District Court for the Central District of California appointed by George W. Bush, has ruled in Jones v. Chappell that the death penalty as currently practiced by the state of California is unconstitutional. In his opinion (which the Death Penalty Information Center has uploaded here, and which you can read at the end of this post), Carney argues that death sentences are carried out in an effectively random and arbitrary manner.
  • A federal judge in Orange County ruled Wednesday that California’s death penalty violates the U.S. Constitution’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment. U.S. District Judge Cormac J. Carney, ruled on a petition by death row inmate Ernest Dewayne Jones, who was sentenced to die nearly two decades ago.
  • The first nonviolent offender released under Proposition 36 is scheduled to pay a visit today to the California Western School of Law to thank lawyers and the school's staff for their help with his release.

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