Post 09-27-2014, 08:05 PM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: America's First Black Attorney General to Step Down

AmcmurryFreedom Wrote: America hasn't seen the last of Eric Holder. Supreme Court Justice Eric holder, it has a great sound to it and a relentless attack on corruption, racism, civil rights violations, campaign funding, wall street crime, women's rights violations, and denying voting rights. Justice Holder, I believe will be perfect for the Supreme Court of the United States.

I support Holder totally for this life-time position improving American justice, equality and fair play for all. I pray this comes as Breaking News in the very near future. Replacing Justice Scalia would be perfect for Eric Holder. Scalia needs to go to the retirement pasture.
I would love to see him on the bench, but I think there is zero chance that President Obama would ever be able to nominate him and actually get him confirmed by the Senate.

If the Republicans take over the Senate and there is a vacancy on the court sometime in the next two years then Obama's hands will pretty much be tied. I just couldn't see a caucus that has spent the last six years demonizing and denigrating him to do an about face and allow his nomination an up or down vote. Hell, these Republicans have even convinced some (supposed) Democrats that he is the devil reincarnate. I just can't put my finger on it as to why they hate him so much...It must have everything to do with him being a tyrannical and lawless Attorney General and nothing to do with the one thing that makes him different than every other Attorney General we've ever seen before.

I could definitely see him being nominated by a future Democratic President, but I just don't see it happening during this Presidency. It's a shame though, because I actually think he was a tremendous Attorney General and would be a great Supreme Court justice.
Post 09-26-2014, 01:51 PM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: America's First Black Attorney General to Step Down

johnnycee Wrote: Please don't respond as my original posting was not in reply to any of your postings.
I'll respond whenever I feel it will further a discussion. I'm sorry to hurt your feelings, but I will continue to expose any members hypocrisy and blatantly anti-Democratic opinions. This is the Democratic Hub, not the Drudge Report.

I'd also remind you that you were the very first person to respond to my original posting. Were you just talking to yourself?

To bring this back to the topic at hand--Attorney General's always have and always will be political. To suggest otherwise is just nonsense.
Post 09-26-2014, 10:29 AM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: America's First Black Attorney General to Step Down

johnnycee Wrote: So any law the Congress passes and the Atty. General feels is wrong , he should be allowed to decide whether or not to enforce it, bypassing the entire Judicial Branch of the government that hears Appeals and which makes the determination of what's considered constitutional or not, that would make that position (Atty. General) the most powerful position in the United States, and you would like that authority to be in the hands of one person. wow!
That is not even remotely what I said, but I must applaud you for one heck of a straw man argument.

What I did say is that you seem to have an odd hatred of this singular Attorney General when all Attorney General's our country's ever had have been partisan politicians. I challenge you to name one, just one, Attorney General in our two hundred plus year history that was not a partisan. I have a feeling that you will struggle mightly with this if you have any elementary knowledge of Attorney General's past.

Let's talk about our most recent (confirmed) Attorney General, Michael Mukasey. He once told the American Bar Association, during his tenure as Attorney General, that "not every wrong, or even every violation of the law, is a crime." I'm sure you see nothing wrong in that, being someone who leans heavily to the right, but how would you react to Eric Holder saying something like that? I have a guess as to how you would.

How about Alberto Gonzalez? Did you feel that he was a runaway Attorney General when he fired multiple District Attorney's for political reasons? Could you imagine if Eric Holder fired a bunch of right leaning DA's? Or what if Eric Holder told a Senate hearing that not every American citizen has a right to writ of habeas corpus? All hell would break loose if he ever said something like that.

These are just two recent examples of former Attorney General's doing things that you would surely call for a resignation if they had been done by a Democrat. It's ok to have differing political leanings, but it's quite easy to expose your blatant hypocrisy.
Post 09-25-2014, 04:36 PM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: America's First Black Attorney General to Step Down

johnnycee Wrote:

the Department of Justice does not need a activist Atty.General, the Atty. general is a prosecutor and must follow the Rule of Law whether or nor he agrees with it, there should be no selective prosecutions but prosecutions that are both fair and unbiased, and also not to be intrusive on State prosecutions because of political reasons, here is where Eric Holder failed miserably. Had he voiced his intended policies where prosecutions would be selectively enforced during his confirmation hearings, do really believe that he would have received the confirmation vote?

Can you name just one Attorney General our country has ever had that fits this standard? Attorney General's always have and always will be partisan. It doesn't matter what side of the aisle they are on. To suggest Eric Holder is some runaway Attorney General who only enforces the laws he wants to enforce only shows your bias.
Post 09-25-2014, 11:41 AM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: America's First Black Attorney General to Step Down

Attorney General Eric Holder is calling it quits after six years of being America's top law enforcement official. He will stay on the job until his replacement is confirmed later this year or early next. President Obama is set to make the announcement official at 4:30 EST today.

I've always been a huge fan of Attorney General Holder and am really sad to see him go. Congressional Republicans and the Republican Party in general have treated him with disrespect and with an unusual personal disdain throughout his tenure, which is something that has always made me sick to my stomach. I have my personal beliefs as to why Republicans treated him in such a way, but I will keep them to myself for now.

Holder may be hated on the right, but I think he will be remembered on the left in a much different way. He has done more to expose the injustice that is rampant in our criminal justice system than anyone before him. He helped narrow the blatantly racist rules and regulations that send blacks and other minorities to far longer prison sentences for using the same drug in a different way. Holder was also a strong advocate of marriage equality long before many other liberals. He light the spark that eventually led to the demise of DOMA when he wrote a 2011 letter to Speaker Boehner informing him that the Justice Department will no longer defend the blatantly anti-gay law in court. The Supreme Court later ruled DOMA unconstitutional.

Needless to say, I will miss Holder. Whoever replaces him will have some very large shoes to fill.
Post 09-20-2014, 02:50 PM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: FSU About Faces, Suspends Winston For One Game Over Obscene Sexual Remark

Florida State reversed course today and decided to bench Heisman winning quarterback Jameis Winston for the entire game today, just days after only suspending him for the first half of the game. The suspension stems from an incident earlier this week where he stood up on a table in the school's student union and allegedly shouted “F*** her right in the p****!” at the top of his lungs. The incident was documented by dozens of students who quickly took to social media to report his actions.

Winston was originally suspended for the first half of the game, but they did an about face and suspended him for the entire game following public outcry and a possible public relations disaster.

Most everyone knows that this is not Winston's first merry-go-round when it comes to getting himself in trouble. The recent rape allegations against him that were swept under the rug by an incompetent police investigation and university that would rather protect their star quarterback than protect their female students was just one in a long line of negative situations Winston continues to find himself in.

The next question is whether the NFL is paying any attention to this slow moving train wreck taking place before their eyes. Their recent public relations disaster(s) can't help when it comes to evaluating whether to take on an individual like Jameis Winston. It will be a real test to see if the almighty dollar is above all, even if they are nearly positive that he will eventually do something to disgrace himself and the league.

Is Winston's one game punishment enough for today, or should Florida State think long and hard before reactivating someone who obviously doesn't know how to stay out of trouble? Do you think this was just a juvenile action done by a college student or is it something more indicative of who he really is as a person?
Post 09-18-2014, 06:45 PM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: Hillary admits that Bush (CIA) created Al Qaeda & ISIS

Dutch Wrote: "Jared" Sure, but which ever way you look at it; we've got our noses into it but do not know how to blow our noses; You clearly indicated that we get ourselves involved in all kind of things in the world which we have no clue whatsoever to resolve with our own screwed up system here. It is the simple thruth; you just can't dictate the world on how Americans think or act and then push this down their throat. Our thinking is not always in line with others on this globe; so get used to that Americans. Amen
I am by no way justifying our involvement in countless nations conflicts. We have inserted ourselves into an innumerable number of conflicts and we have reaped what we sewed, but we should also be cognizant of the facts. That is all I was responding to.


Post 09-18-2014, 04:26 PM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: Hillary admits that Bush (CIA) created Al Qaeda & ISIS

We have known for a long time that Al-Qaeda was a monster we created, so I'm not quite sure I follow you here. George H.W. Bush was Vice President during the Russian-Afghan war, not CIA Director. He was the CIA director from '76-'77--three years before the Russian invasion of Afghanistan.

Bush I was not the President who began the arming of the Mujahideen fighters. That distinction belong to President Carter, who began arming the Mujahideen in 1979. Reagan and Bush I then continued and expanded this policy, but Bush I was President for less than one month when the conflict ended. He only gets credit because it ended after he took office, but any person who knows history understands that he had little to nothing to do with anything in Afghanistan.

Now, we can have a discussion about his decision to pull all of our resources out of Afghanistan after Russia pulled out, but that is hardly the same thing as saying that he is solely responsible for creating Al-Qaeda.

There is also little to no direct correlation between the Al-Qaeda that we have been fighting in Afghanistan and the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. The only correlation would be that they both hate America, but that's about it. ISIS is made up of disenfranchised Sunni's, many of whom are former members of the Iraqi Army under Saddam Hussein, and Sunni militants fighting Bashar al-Assad in Syria. They are a low-grade terror organization that knows how to make one to two minute videos an average high school kid with a computer and internet connection can make. They also know how to rob banks and happen to have convinced a few rich Sunnis to funnel them some funds. They are not some all powerful entity that can bring America to its knees and we shouldn't treat them as such. We should treat them as a menace that is wreaking havoc on a piece of land the size of Jordan.
Post 09-17-2014, 10:21 AM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: Stern Parenting or Child Abuse? It Depends on Who You Ask

After the damning revelation that Peterson seems to have a history of being a little too harsh on another young child of his, the Vikings finally did the right thing that benched him indefinitely. He will not be allowed to participate in any team activity and will not be dressing for any games while his legal troubles work their way through the court.

Read more at NFL.com
Post 09-13-2014, 02:09 PM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: Stern Parenting or Child Abuse? It Depends on Who You Ask

It seemed almost impossible for the NFL's bad week to get worse, but that is exactly what happened after Texas authorities charged star running back Adrian Peterson with child abuse after one of his children returned home to his mother and she noticed markings throughout his body consistent with a switch or small tree branch. Peterson does not deny striking his child, but insists that it was only 'stern parenting.'

Child abuse and endangerment is a topic that is near and dear to me. Having worked with both physically and emotionally abused children living in a residential treatment facility, I can attest first hand that the harm this does to children both physically and psychologically lasts throughout their lifetimes. The emotional toll abuse takes on a child is incalculable and it is time we begin to move away from corporal punishment whenever a young child does something 'wrong' and transition into a more therapeutic way of teaching them life's rules and lessons.

I am well aware that many people will disagree with my point of view. I'm sure I will be called weak or be accused of turning all of our boys into 'wussies' because they can't handle a slap or two. The problem with that is that the numbers behind corporal punishment are crystal clear that it actually makes kids more, not less, violent. States that still allow corporal punishment in schools also have the highest rates of incarceration in America; they have far higher rates of poverty; and their educational performance ranks among the lowest in the country. Corporal punishment in the home is a much trickier issue. There are currently no state laws that ban corporal punishment in the home and the line between spanking and felonious abuse is often left to be interpreted by the states.

Now, back to Adrian Peterson. A grand jury in Texas has found that there is sufficient enough evidence to file child abuse charges against him. I am sympathetic to his claim that he was only engaging in stern parenting, but the problem with that defense is that there is a very fine line between stern parenting and child abuse. Unfortunately for Peterson, a Texas District Attorney believes he crossed that line.

I'm interested to see what others on this site think about Adrian Peterson's recent arrest and corporal punishment in general. Do you believe it is an appropriate way to discipline children, even with ever mounting evidence stating otherwise? Or are you against corporal punishment and think it's time we start teaching kids the difference between right and wrong in an entirely new way?
Post 09-12-2014, 09:41 PM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: Kerry claims we are not at war

Dutch Wrote: I'm getting a bit sick of the "wording" game played in Washington; Kerry says no this no war but just a "chase' after terrorists like in Somalia and Yemen. The White House says it is a war, So who is right?

The news makes a big deal out of that; crazy!! Regardless of what it is it will cost us billions which we don't have. But let the fun start.

In my point of view it is another aggression on another sovereign country (Syria) by the US; I call that "war" ; war equipment is used; people will die etc. In the meantime ISIS is growing rapidly with more and more members. Guess what I predicted this many years ago; the more the US meddles in this world with money bribery and weapons sales to corrupt countries the more the lower classes in these countries will hate us. The more "drones" we throw at them the more recruits will join them. Sorry our government still does not understand that picture. I saw only one person on CNN who did understand that, but was turned away quickly because a "retired" general knew it much better. I'll just sit back and watch this disaster unfold; I wish this country lots of luck if it continues with these policies.
I agree with much of what you say Dutch, but the problem is that our constitution is very specific when it comes to the word 'war.'

Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution reads that the Congress has the power "To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water." These aren't just words on a piece of paper, but are the rules that are supposed to govern us.

Don't think that I'm trying to disagree with you here though. I would love to have a discussion about the Patriot Act and, more importantly, the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Terrorists. Our Congress willfully and deliberately abrogated their duties and gave the Executive the legal ability to have unchecked powers when it comes to waging wars as long as the Executive is doing it in the name of 'fighting terrorism.' It's time that we fight back against this and demand our Legislative Branch actually do the job they are Constitutionally mandated to do.
Post 09-11-2014, 04:48 PM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: Civil unrest in Ferguson Missouri

We don't have a culpable homicide charge in the United States, but the closest thing we do have to it is a manslaughter charge. I agree that it would be difficult to charge Officer Wilson with first degree murder, but I definitely believe there is more than enough eyewitness accounts and an autopsy that provides more than enough evidence for a second degree murder or, at the very least, manslaughter charges. It would be an absolute tragedy if this officer got away with murdering an unarmed teenager that had his hands up and was trying to surrender, as multiple witnesses have claimed.
Post 09-11-2014, 11:59 AM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: Civil unrest in Ferguson Missouri

Those who were so valiantly sticking up for officer Wilson have gone rather silent lately and I don't blame them considering more and more witness accounts are coming out insisting he shot Michael Brown in cold blood. Video released today of the moments immediately after the murder back up these eyewitness accounts even more. I'm sure these supporters will find some other reason to demonize Michael Brown and stick up for Darren Wilson because, well, they just can't accept that maybe a white police officer shot an unarmed black teenager in cold blood.
Post 09-09-2014, 11:35 AM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: Admitted Domestic Abuser Prepares to Rake in Over $30 Million on Saturday

My father has taught me countless lessons throughout my life that I continue to abide by and will teach to a future child of mine. These lessons include respecting elders, surrounding oneself with positive influences, and treating everyone, even those with whom we may disagree, with dignity and respect. One of the other main lessons he taught me from a very young age is to respect women and to never, ever lay a hand on them. Unfortunately, far too many professional athletes and celebrities alike believe they don't have to heed the latter of these generally accepted life rules.

As convicted domestic abuser Floyd Mayweather is set to rake in 30 plus million for a few minutes in a boxing ring on Saturday, September 13, we must begin to think about why we so easily forgive our favorite sports or celebrity personality for beating their significant others. What is it about being famous that makes someone above the law. Not just that, but why do we so easily forgive someone for committing a heinous crime because we are partial to watching them compete on television?

For those of you who aren't aware, Mayweather plead guilty to beating his then girlfriend in 2010. Mayweather plead guilty to punching his girlfriend and pulling her hair. His punishment for the crime he admitted to doing? Sixty days in county jail. His punishment from the world of boxing? Nothing. Nada. Zilch. His reward for being a convicted domestic abuser? He is now the richest athlete in the world. By a long shot.

Mayweather's behavior back in 2010 may not be an isolated incident, either. Just last week his ex-fiance Shantel Jackson filed a civil lawsuit accusing Mayweather of false imprisonment and civil harrassment. The lawsuit claims that Mayweather forced 'Miss Jackson,' as he often referred to her, of not allowing her to leave his home without one of his employees in tow and that he was verbally abusive to her on more than one occasion. Mayweather has yet to publicly comment on the lawsuit.

You may be wondering how someone can admit to beating their significant other, spend 90 days in jail, and go on to become the richest athlete in the entire world. I'm sure many people are wondering that. The interesting thing about boxing is that there is no central governing body that has a code of conduct for those who participate in the matches they hold, which means that each boxer is essentially an independent contractor. This is how a boxer can beat his girlfriend, serve his time, and become the highest paid athlete in the world.

It would be bad enough if Mayweather was the only celebrity that committed these heinous crimes, but he is just one in a long list of celebrities who have a hard time keeping their hands to themselves. The most recent example of this is now former Baltimore Raven Ray Rice, who was caught on tape punching his then fiance in the face, knocking her out cold, and then dragging her unconscious body out of a casino elevator. Rice was initially suspended for two games because there was only video of him dragging his fiances lifeless body out of the elevator and no video of him actually hitting her. Only after video surfaced of him punching her at full force did he get cut from the team and indefinitely suspended from the NFL. How the NFL handled this fiasco is borderline criminal, but at least they have the ability to kick a domestic abuser out of the league, unlike in the world of boxing.

In the world of boxing it is entirely acceptable to be convicted of beating up a woman and go on to become the richest athlete in the world. So I encourage you to ask yourself this one question if you find yourself rooting for Mayweather this weekend: would you feel comfortable if he was dating your daughter or would you fear for her safety?
Post 09-08-2014, 11:04 PM
jaredsxtn

Democrat
Portland, OR
Posts: 2617
Thread: Never Mind Being Cut by the Ravens, Ray Rice Needs to be Behind Bars

Ray Rice is out of a job now that the Baltimore Ravens fired him and the NFL suspended him indefinitely after a damning new video showing him brutally punching his now wife in the face and then dragging her out of an elevator following a dispute between the two. The incident happened months ago and Rice was already serving a two game suspension after video showed him dragging his fiance out of an elevator and callously dropping her on the ground, but did not show him actually punching her. How the NFL decided that Rice dragging his unconscious girlfriend out of an elevator only warranted a two game suspension, but then drop the hammer on him when video showing him punching her surfaces shows that the NFL has an extremely long way to go in addressing this issue.

Today's video only gives us more questions than answers as to what in the world the NFL was thinking in suspending a player who was video taped dragging his fiance out of an elevator for two games, but didn't decide to investigate more into the issue and seemingly tried to sweep the whole thing under the rug. It also makes me wonder if the NFL was in possession of this tape the entire time. I don't buy it for one second that they didn't investigate whether there was a video camera inside the elevator. If they are being truthful when they say that today was the first they ever saw it then the entire division of the NFL that conducts investigations needs to be fired for negligence.

Here's what I think happened: the NFL and the Ravens knew exactly what happened that day and wanted to keep this whole thing under wraps. The fact that his fiance decided to stay with him is her decision alone and something I will not even begin to try to judge. However, just because she decided not to press charges doesn't mean that Rice shouldn't have been fully investigated. The NFL, and to a greater extent, professional sports, are woefully behind the curve when it comes to fighting this problem. It is absolutely unacceptable to put your hands on a woman, let alone punch her in the face. It makes me sick that he will not be facing any serious charges in this blatantly felonious battery. Jeffrey Toobin of CNN put it perfectly when he said that the charges Rice plead to are a 'disgrace' and that the District Attorney overseeing the case 'embarrassed the country, [and] embarrassed themselves.

Has anyone been following this case? Are you as angry as me at the NFL and judicial system for seemingly allowing a woman abuser to walk free because he was a professional athlete and they wanted to keep it under wraps? What has our judicial system come to in this country where this is acceptable?
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